Published: Sat, August 11, 2018
Business | By Kate Woods

Ryanair strike in five European nations

Ryanair strike in five European nations

A spokesperson said: "Despite regrettable and unjustified strike action taking place in 5 of our 37 markets on Friday (10 Aug), over 2,000 Ryanair flights (85% of our schedule) will operate as normal tomorrow carrying nearly 400,000 customers across Europe".

Despite the walkouts, 85pc of its scheduled flights, more than 2,000, will operate as normal, Ryanair said.

"For decades Ryanair has refused their employees basic labour rights most employees on the labour market take for granted, but here a strike is necessary to show the airline that it no longer can avoid treating its employees in a dignified manner", Martin Lindgren, President of the Swedish Pilots' Union, said in a statement.

In July, around 300 flights were cancelled in similar strikes in Portugal, Spain and Belgium.

Belgium-based Ryanair pilots gather at Charleroi Airport as part of a European-wide strike.

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Unions are pushing for better pay and conditions at Ryanair and want collective labour contracts governed by local laws, rather than Irish ones.

But Ryanair pilots say they earn less than counterparts at other airlines like Lufthansa.

Aircrafts of low-priced airliner Ryanair are parked at the tarmac of Weeze airport near the German-Dutch border during a wider European strike of Ryanair airline crews to protest slow progress in negotiating a collective labour agreement at Weeze airport, Germany, August 10, 2018.

The Dutch pilots union VNV said it was the first time in Europe that an airline had gone to court to prevent industrial action, the Financieele Dagblad reported.

Yesterday, at the eleventh hour, they were joined by Dutch pilots after an unsuccessful attempt by the airline to obtain a court order blocking the strike action.

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Will Ryanair be offering compensation for travellers?

Ryanair has repeatedly said it remained open to further talks with pilot representatives.

Among other issues, they are also seeking changes to Ryanair's practice of moving staff to different bases without much notice, and a reduction in hours.

That was because the strikes were hurting bookings, Ryanair said, and although it was too early to assess the impact elsewhere, it added that the action will hit average fares from having to move customers to flights it could otherwise have sold at a high last-minute price.

"We want to again apologise to customers affected by this unnecessary disruption and we ask the striking unions to continue negotiations instead of calling anymore unjustified strikes".

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