Published: Thu, June 14, 2018
Culture&Arts | By Laurence Reese

Rebel Wilson damages slashed on appeal

Rebel Wilson damages slashed on appeal

Rebel Wilson has had her record $4.6 million Australian damages award in a defamation case slashed to $600,000 after a magazine publisher appealed the amount of the payout.

On Wednesday the actress tweeted that despite the Court of Appeal being due to hand down its decision on the magazine publisher's damages appeal on Thursday, she has "already won the case".

During the trial, Wilson said her agents had advised her to stop mentioning her age - which was reported to be 29 in 2015 - because "Hollywood is very ageist, especially towards women".

However the Court of Appeal found "there was no basis in the evidence for making any award of damages for economic loss".

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Speaking on behalf of Bauer Media, General Counsel, Adrian Goss, said in a statement: "It was important for us to revisit the award of damages".

Wilson, 38, was not present when the court handed down its ruling and published a 252-page judgement.

The court set aside the decision to give Wilson around $3.9 million for economic losses, and reduced the $650,000 compensation figure awarded to the actor for non-economic loss by $50,000.

The actress is now filming in Europe, and ahead of the decision, took to Twitter last night to say that regardless of the level of payout, she had won the case.

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Going into the appeal, Wilson stood firm in her fight against Bauer Media.

Bauer successfully challenged the finding that Wilson should be compensated for film roles, including Trolls and Kung Fu Panda 3, which she testified she had lost following the articles' publication.

Wilson said previously that she would donate the money made from the case to charity and use it to support the Australian film industry.

Wilson argued the "serial liar" allegations had ruined her reputation and cost her lucrative movie roles.

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When Wilson won the case past year, it was an Australian record for a case, much higher than the AUS$389,000 maximum previously set, by using her "global reach" as justification.

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