Published: Wed, June 13, 2018
Sports | By Brooke Harris

NCAA changes redshirt rule in college football

NCAA changes redshirt rule in college football

The previous transfer rule, which required student-athletes to get permission from their current school to contact another school before they can receive a scholarship after transfer, was meant to discourage coaches from recruiting student-athletes from other Division I schools.

It will begin this fall, with the 2018 season, wiping away the need for schools to petition the NCAA for a medical redshirt if a player had already played in a game.

"This change promotes not only fairness for college athletes, but also their health and well-being", Miami AD Blake James said in a statement to the NCAA on the redshirt rule change. The Division I Board of Directors developed a series of principles to guide the Transfer Working group, which included that any rule changes should "support the academic success of student-athletes", and "be based on data and create the least restrictive environment possible for student-athletes".

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According to the NCAA's release, student-athletes who wish to transfer will notify their current school of their desire to transfer.

It removes the upper hand that schools have long held over student-athletes looking to transfer.

"This creates a safe place for student-athletes to have a conversation with their coaches and makes the whole process more transparent", said Nicholas Clark, a former player at Coastal Carolina who represents the Division I Student-Athlete Advisory Committee.

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To be clear, undergraduates still have to sit out a year when transferring.

The change will allow players to maintain a year of eligibility in the event of injuries of other factors require them to play and opens the door to greater development earlier in a players' college career.

In an attempt to prevent schools from tampering with student-athletes already enrolled at another institution, the NCAA has made tampering a Level 2 violation. More often than not, it limited players from speaking to other schools in the same conference or on future schedules.

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But a change to that rule will now allow for some breathing room. There was never serious consideration to lifting the year-in-residence altogether, but tying unrestricted transfer to an athlete's grade-point average was considered. The autonomy conferences will consider, by an electronic vote, two different proposals to allow schools to cancel the aid.

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