Published: Wed, June 13, 2018
Global | By Marsha Munoz

Dominic Grieve DEMANDS PM compromise on Brexit or face another Parliament SHOWDOWN


On Tuesday and Wednesday MPs are debating 14 amendments to the EU Withdrawal Bill made by the House of Lords. "That's what this House voted on Article 50".

She could be heard being cheered from outside the room in parliament where lawmakers from both sides of the debate, including some of her ministers, gathered on the eve of the votes.

Dismissing the Government's compromise, she tweeted: "Merely issuing a statement in response would make it a meaningless final vote".

The concession allowed the government to defeat a Lords amendment calling for parliament to have "a meaningful vote" on any eventual Brexit deal by 324 votes to 298.

Some lawmakers tried to shout him down and accused the government of wanting too much power.

That is when Theresa May reportedly gave 15-20 Conservative "rebels" assurances that the government would accept the general meaning of Dominic Grieve's alternative amendment.

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In a highly charged atmosphere in parliament, lawmakers who oppose the government said they had received death threats and brandished a copy of one of Britain's tabloid newspapers, the Daily Express, which ran a headline saying: "Ignore the will of the people at your peril".

Dismissing claims that Mrs May had effectively abandoned her threat that the United Kingdom could leave the European Union without a deal, Mr Jenkin said: "There is only agreement for discussions, not concessions".

"First, we must never do anything that undermines the Government's negotiating position or encourages delays in the negotiations", Mr Davis said. The slow progress is in part because the premier can't get her cabinet to agree on the kind of post-Brexit trade regime they want the U.K.to have with the EU.

And in a final vote, MPs voted by 326 votes to 301 to disagree with Lords amendment 52 linked to what European Union laws the United Kingdom will keep after Brexit.

"I can not support the government's decision to oppose this amendment because doing so breaches such fundamental principles of human rights and parliamentary sovereignty", he said.

Asked about what had been promised, Mr Buckland, the solicitor general, said the government remained "open-minded" but he would not "blithely" commit to any changes until he had had those conversations.

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The debate, which lasted for almost three hours, was split down the usual non-partisan lines that have emerged as a result of Brexit, with the likes of Labour's Kate Hoey and John Mann saying they would back the Conservative government, while Tories including Ken Clarke and Anna Soubry spoke in favour of Grieve.

He confirmed that ministers will seek to overturn 14 amendments which he said would undermine the goal of the Bill and fail to respect the result of the 2016 referendum.

"The main reason for my taking this decision now is the Brexit process and the government's wish to limit parliament's role in contributing to the final outcome in a vote that takes place today", Lee, who voted to remain in the European Union during Britain's 2016 referendum, said on his website.

In a battle of wills between the prime minister and the House of Commons on Tuesday, it was Theresa May who emerged weakened having been pushed into a series of significant concessions to anti-Brexit Conservative MPs in order to fend off a damaging parliamentary defeat.

Ms. May's minority government relies on the support of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party for a slender working majority in the 650-member Commons.

More news: Brexit: House of Lords EU Withdrawal Bill amendment voted down by MPs

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