Published: Wed, June 13, 2018
Technology | By Christopher Mann

Ajit Pai says you’re going to love the death of net neutrality


The repeal takes effect six months after the Federal Communications Commission voted to undo them. Opponents of the net neutrality law - including big broadband providers like Verizon, AT&T and Comcast - argued that getting rid of net neutrality would lead to new investment and a more open and competitive internet.

As already noted, today's the day that the FCC's 2015 net neutrality rules are officially eliminated. For most of the country, unfettered access to the internet now depends on the goodwill of their service providers. It corresponds closely to the previous federal rule, barring ISPs from blocking or throttling the bandwidth on any legal content, service, app, or device, subject to reasonable network management.

Last month, the Senate voted 52-47 in favor of keeping net neutrality, but the vote was mostly symbolic, as the final decision had to be passed through the Republican majority House of Representatives. Those protections are transparency rules that require ISPs to publicly disclose any blocking, throttling, or paid prioritization.

"Those "fast lanes" will put those who won't or can not pay in the slow lane, making the internet look a lot like cable TV", Sohn says. Basically everyone from consumer advocates to human rights groups and even tech companies supported net neutrality, but, of course, that didn't stop the FCC from overturning it.

More news: George and Charlotte goof off at William's polo match

Millions of USA broadband customers have started facing the latest internet experience from Monday because Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have new powers to block, throttle or offer paid fast lanes for content companies under the new law.

In an editorial over at CNET, Pai offers up the equivalent of a "greatest hits" of all of his misleading statements so far, including claims that killing the popular consumer protections will somehow result in more transparency, faster broadband speeds, better broadband deployment, and lower prices.

What's the logic behind the new rules, exactly? It may also make it harder for the next generation of online services to compete if they have to pay up to be placed in a so-called internet fast lane.

The revised rules were a win for ISPs, whose practices faced significant government oversight and FCC investigations under the 2015 order. The repeal will also let ISPs charge websites or online services for priority access to consumers.

More news: South Koreans skeptical about peace after summit

However, according to the FCC, states don't have the power to make their own policies. "Democrats are fighting in the courts and in the Congress to protect Americans' interests and restore these vital protections, and we will continue to demand a vote on Congressman Mike Doyle's resolution to force a vote to restore net neutrality". T-Mobile, for example, was criticized by net neutrality supporters for effectively making it cheaper for customers to stream videos from Netflix and HBO, putting other video services at a disadvantage.

Yet, some fear it's also possible internet providers will one day effectively charge customers more to access services like Netflix that are now included as part of your monthly bill.

Yesterday marked the end of U.S. government rules regarding net neutrality, but the new policy faces legal challenges from individual states, some of which have also developed their own rules on the matter.

More news: Steve Trevor is somehow back in first look at Wonder Woman 1984

Like this: