Published: Tue, April 17, 2018
Global | By Marsha Munoz

Boy finds treasure linked to Viking king 'Harald Bluetooth' on Baltic island

Boy finds treasure linked to Viking king 'Harald Bluetooth' on Baltic island

Archaeologists believe the riches belonged to the Danish king Harald Gormsson, more commonly known as "Bluetooth", who ruled from about A.D.

For the first time, two Amateur archaeologists found a silver coin in January of this year in a field near the German settlement Schaprode. They reported their notice into any off ice and after led to the sweep performed from the team of authorities.

However they were sworn to secrecy until the experts could move in and unearth the entire treasure. They were then invited to participate in the recovery.

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The archaeologists excavated numerous necklaces, bracelets, rings, coins and a hammer on the island of Rügen near the village of Schaprode. After losing power, Bluetooth fled to Pomerania, a region that includes parts of modern northeast Germany and western Poland, according to USA Today. Back in 2015, a man discovered Roman-era coins, mosaic glassware, and hobnails from a pair of shoes and last year, four 2,000 year gold torques were unearthed in England.

The oldest coin in the trove is a Damascus dirham dating to 714 while the most recent is a Frankish Otto-Adelheid penny minted in 983.

Gormsson was one of the last Viking kings of Denmark and became popular for bringing Christianity to the country. "We have here the rare case of a discovery that appears to corroborate historical sources", archaeologist Detlef Jantzen told the Guardian.

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His nickname - from one dead tooth that looked bluish - is now best known for the wireless Bluetooth technology invented by Swedish telecom company Ericsson. This feat inspired Intel's Jim Kardach to name the tech service in honor of Bluetooth in 1997, given that "the new technology that would unify communications protocols like King Harald had united Scandinavia", according to Tom's Hardware, a Live Science sister site.

The logo is made up of the two ancient runes spelling out his initials HB.

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