Published: Fri, March 09, 2018
Medical | By Marta Holmes

Study shows babies who look like dad are healthier

Study shows babies who look like dad are healthier

"Fathers are important in raising a child, and it manifests itself in the health of the child", said one of the researchers Solomon Polachek, Professor at the Binghamton University in NY. Solomon Polachek, distinguished Research Professor of Economics at Binghamton University, SUNY - yes, that's his title - and Marlon Tracey, Professor of Business Administration at Southern Illinois University, looked at data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing (FFCW) study, which examined the health of children living in 715 single mother households in the U.S. "This data is appropriate since paternity uncertainty is more likely to prevail among fragile families".

Following the families for over a year, researchers concluded that the babies who spend more time with their fathers "have significantly more favourable health conditions". Dr. Polachek said that fathers perceiving the babies to be theirs tended to spend more time with them in positive parenting.

This resulted in a 10 to 25 percent fewer emergency room visits, asthma and incidences of illness.

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A new study has revealed that babies who look like their dads are healthier than babies that don't resemble their fathers.

"We find a child's health indicators improve when the child looks like the father", the research states.

Newborns who resemble their dads have a healthy leg up on their first birthday. Moms should have their children spend as much time with their fathers as possible during infancy and beyond. This could be achieved, Polachek said by health education, parenting classes and also vocational training that could increase earnings.

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Looking like Dad may improve the health of infants being raised by single mothers.

"It's been said that "it takes a village" but [we found] that having an involved father certainly helps", Polachek said.

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